We all become very cautious when something relates to our children. And when it is a matter of their health, there are no compromises or mistakes. Specifically, when doctors suggest medicine with food, we never think of taking that medicine on an empty stomach. But does it matter whether we follow the instructions or do as we may feel? Let’s have a look at it today.

Absorption of medicine

When we eat food, there are many physiological changes that start to take place in the body, like an increase in blood flow, changes in acidity level, and mobility of the gut. These changes in the body can also affect the medicine that we take.

When a doctor advises taking medicine after having a particular food, then the medical needs that environment for absorbing in the blood. On the contact, if an increase in acidity may stop the medicine from fulfilling its purpose, then a doctor may suggest taking medicine on an empty stomach.

Size matters

Depending on the types of medicine the doctor suggests, the size of the meal matters. If a medicine is to be taken with food, but even a snack will serve the purpose, then we might give our child snacks. However, certain medicines require a full meal to function better.

Meal composition also matters. Having food high in fiber, calcium, or protein can affect the functionality of medicine. Drinks like juices, tea, and milk also have a different impact on medicine. Similarly, the consumption of dairy products also has its own effect on medicine.

Cautions

It is good to read the label of the medicine for instructions about food. This would help to give the medicine in the right form to your child. If the label says that the medicine is not to be taken on an empty stomach, then following the exact instruction would keep your child safe.

Pediatric Health Care is extremely careful about giving the correct instructions to the children and their parents so that every kid stays safe. Call us on 281-655-1500 or 936-539-8190 if you have any doubts about any medicine and its related instructions.